Stories-Current

Graeme Watson, Master of Many Trades

Graeme Watson spent five years at Marcellin, from 1952 until he matriculated in 1956.  His contemporaries remember him mainly for his sporting prowess and his handsome tousled head of hair.  He captained the First XVlll in 1955, at the time when Marcellin first joined the Associated Catholic Colleges, and he led them to victory over CBC North Melbourne in their very first game.

Following school he gained a Science degree from the University of Melbourne and, seeing himself as a science teacher, he also took a secondary teaching certificate from the Secondary Teachers College.  Before hitting the classroom, however, he gained hands-on experience as an analyst in the laboratory, first in the dye industry, then at Carlton & United Breweries.

Thirty years in the classroom followed, mainly around central Victoria.  The quality of his work was rewarded by appointments as Principal at each of Nathalia, Mooroopna and Seymour High Schools.  The Physical Education and Performing Arts complex at Seymour was named after Graeme.

He followed his career in education with five years back in industry, becoming interstate manager of a national plastics company.  From there he transitioned into semi-retirement, running a beef producing property out of Shepparton, which he and his wife Elsa had owned for 20 years.

Elsa and Graeme, who have three daughters and six grand-children, have travelled extensively in Australia and overseas.  Graeme has always maintained his interest and participation in sport, still playing veterans tennis and badminton.

Looking back to his Marcellin days, it is Br Roger whom he remembers most fondly, with special mentions of Br Eustace for cultivating his interest in science and mathematics and Br Stanislaus for the encouragement in sport.  In those days he would never foreseen that international travel lay ahead of him, and much less that he would become involved in beef production.

Graeme had two younger brothers at Marcellin, Adrian who was tragically killed in a traffic accident in 1985, and Kelvin, who has lived for 40 years in Townsville.  Kelvin is now retired following a career in sales and administration in the plumbing industry.